Casa Fuerte

Casa Fuerte

In the middle of the 16th century there was one last sugar plantation on the island, located in Adeje, fuelled by the waters of the Barranco del Infierno. This plantation was situated where the Casa Fuerte building now stands and it was the most important sugar plantation in Tenerife. In 1553, Pedro Ponte ordered the construction of a fortification to defend the area from the continuous pirate invasions that assaulted the Costa Adeje. In 1555, it was authorised and in 1556 a stronghold was built: over the course of the next three centuries it would become the political, economic and social centre of the Adeje region under the rule of the Ponte family.

A fortified residence that was a mix between a rural house and a fortress and that had an almost square floor plan, it covered an area of 7,200 m². It was comprised of a castle and keep, storehouses, granaries, a stable, forge, bakery, ovens, living quarters for servants and administrators, a chapel, and a main palace. According to the French naturalist, Sabin Berthelot, “the most important room was the Sala de Archivos”, which had four large cupboards filled with documents that were defined by the historian, José de Viera y Clavijo, as “the Treasure of the Canaries.”