The Franciscan convent, Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe y San Pablo

The Franciscan convent, Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe y San Pablo

Declared a Place of Cultural Interest in 1986 in the Monument category. Today, the convent’s church still stands. It was acquired in 1988 by the local government but over the years it has had different uses, acting as an inn for a company of soldiers, a warehouse for tomato packaging, and a secondary school, among other uses. In 1991, it was restored before being opened to the public as the Museum of Sacred Art in May 1995.

On 10 August 1679, a convent was founded in Adeje with the name Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe y San Pablo under the initiative of Juan Bautista de Ponte Fonte y Pagés, the first marquis of Adeje. It was founded with eight or nine monks from the Franciscan Order and it was the nineteenth in the province. In 1802, only three brothers and one lay brother remained. After their expulsion in 1835, the building was torn down little by little and converted into the headquarters of the local government. Today, the convent’s church is still there.

In 1991, it was restored and opened to the public as the Salón de Actos Nobles in May 1995. Since then, the local government has used it for formal or significant events such as civil weddings, the opening of the summer university, and the venue of classical music concerts.

The choir is made of wood and the main door opens out onto the street. The church has a main nave and chapel that can be accessed via a triumphal stone arch supported by stone columns and adorned with Corinthian capitals, on which there is a Baroque entablature. The wooden, Mudejar-style coffered ceiling, in addition to that of the nave and the chancel, are prominent features, although the chancel is richer and very similar to that of the Iglesia de Santa Úrsula. Outside, above the main door, the shield of Juan Bautista de Ponte Fonte y Pagés, which is made from marble and a wooden Baroque frame, is displayed.